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*3
$15 or $60 ++ Diana lens adapter for Canon or Nikon (via Photo Jojo)

$15 or $60 ++ Diana lens adapter for Canon or Nikon (via Photo Jojo)

*6
$450 Mid Century Industrial Medical Deskwalnut, steel, aluminum

$450 Mid Century Industrial Medical Desk
walnut, steel, aluminum

*5
I call it soda

I call it soda

(Source: dansrules)

*18
When I was a little kid one of my dad’s distant relatives (maybe a brother in-law?) had a pinball machine in the basement of his home. I must’ve been seven or something, but playing arcade games in the house is the coolest experience a seven-year-old could ever wish for. 
It’s a sad thing that we live in a world where the 1980’s classic arcade games aren’t sitting at the entrance of our grocery stores. Shoot, my kids will be born into a world without vintage.

When I was a little kid one of my dad’s distant relatives (maybe a brother in-law?) had a pinball machine in the basement of his home. I must’ve been seven or something, but playing arcade games in the house is the coolest experience a seven-year-old could ever wish for. 

It’s a sad thing that we live in a world where the 1980’s classic arcade games aren’t sitting at the entrance of our grocery stores. Shoot, my kids will be born into a world without vintage.

*9
so old school. there is history in this place.
sunday-storms: untitled by melancholija on Flickr.

so old school. there is history in this place.

sunday-stormsuntitled by melancholija on Flickr.

(Source: ofthemorning)

*18
I would play this for hours.

I would play this for hours.

(Source: vicious-shazam)

*44
edgina:

Vibes from the 80’s by Creative Touch

edgina:

Vibes from the 80’s by Creative Touch

artunion:

The Fiat 600 Multipla (1956-1966) is altogether so much better looking than today’s version.
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Art Union | Facebook | Twitter

artunion:

The Fiat 600 Multipla (1956-1966) is altogether so much better looking than today’s version.

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Art Union | Facebook | Twitter

*60
I blogged the Pepsi Cola sign at the ballpark earlier…you can’t have Pepsi without Coca Cola Classic.
artunion:

 
The making of a Coca-Cola neon sign, 1954
 
“In the new issue of CR, I talk to Coca-Cola archivist, Ted Ryan, about the history of the brand’s 125 year-old identity, explored in a new show at the

 Design Museum. One of the highlights of the display is a book documenting the design and build of their first neon sign for Piccadilly Circus, in 1954…
When he returned to Atlanta, Ryan kindly sourced some scans of some of the pages from this rare publication, a few of which we used in the print piece in the July issue. The rest we present here as a series, alongside two Technical Data pages, should anyone be interested in how the sign was actually constructed.
The opening page of the book reads as follows: “Outdoor Publicity Limited are pleased to present this volume to The Coca-Cola Export Corporation to record the lighting of the Piccadilly Sign in London on July 1st, 1954”. Then the design credits are: ”Designed by the Advertising Department of The Coca-Cola Company, in Atlanta, U.S.A., and constructed by Claude-General Neon Lights Ltd in their factory at Wembley, Middlesex”.
Ryan looks after the physical Coca-Cola archives at the Atlanta HQ, which can be toured (virtually) via theverybestofcocacola.com. The July issue of CR features a range of work from the archives, including some examples of early tie-ins with baseball stars from 1907; one of the first print advertisements to feature an African-American woman from 1955; and several pages of the Coca-Cola design manuals used in the 1960s.
The July issue will be up online very soon (for subscriber access) but you can also take advantage of a 40% subscription here,

 for this weekend only, as part of our deal celebrating reaching 400k followers on Twitter.”

-
Art Union | Facebook | Twitter

I blogged the Pepsi Cola sign at the ballpark earlier…you can’t have Pepsi without Coca Cola Classic.

artunion:

The making of a Coca-Cola neon sign, 1954

“In the new issue of CR, I talk to Coca-Cola archivist, Ted Ryan, about the history of the brand’s 125 year-old identity, explored in a new show at the

 Design Museum. One of the highlights of the display is a book documenting the design and build of their first neon sign for Piccadilly Circus, in 1954…

When he returned to Atlanta, Ryan kindly sourced some scans of some of the pages from this rare publication, a few of which we used in the print piece in the July issue. The rest we present here as a series, alongside two Technical Data pages, should anyone be interested in how the sign was actually constructed.

The opening page of the book reads as follows: “Outdoor Publicity Limited are pleased to present this volume to The Coca-Cola Export Corporation to record the lighting of the Piccadilly Sign in London on July 1st, 1954”. Then the design credits are: ”Designed by the Advertising Department of The Coca-Cola Company, in Atlanta, U.S.A., and constructed by Claude-General Neon Lights Ltd in their factory at Wembley, Middlesex”.

Ryan looks after the physical Coca-Cola archives at the Atlanta HQ, which can be toured (virtually) via theverybestofcocacola.com. The July issue of CR features a range of work from the archives, including some examples of early tie-ins with baseball stars from 1907; one of the first print advertisements to feature an African-American woman from 1955; and several pages of the Coca-Cola design manuals used in the 1960s.

The July issue will be up online very soon (for subscriber access) but you can also take advantage of a 40% subscription here,

 for this weekend only, as part of our deal celebrating reaching 400k followers on Twitter.”

-

Art Union | Facebook | Twitter

*15
Really, they should roll with the old logo in my opinion. Yours?
paulkatcher:

Pepsi Sign at Citi Field on Flickr.

Really, they should roll with the old logo in my opinion. Yours?

paulkatcher:

Pepsi Sign at Citi Field on Flickr.

*6
that is sooo hot

that is sooo hot

latimes:

“Oct. 31, 1950: Bernard ‘Big Duke’ Docusen hangs on to the ropes at end of the second round after taking several hard punches from John L. Davis. The referee halted the bout on a technical knockout immediately after third round started.” 

latimes:

“Oct. 31, 1950: Bernard ‘Big Duke’ Docusen hangs on to the ropes at end of the second round after taking several hard punches from John L. Davis. The referee halted the bout on a technical knockout immediately after third round started.” 

(Source: Los Angeles Times)

*10
*3
The lesser-known Dr. Wells….
lynseyintheskywithdiamonds:

untitled by Greg Headley on Flickr.

The lesser-known Dr. Wells….

lynseyintheskywithdiamonds:

untitled by Greg Headley on Flickr.

*24
Before instagram there was …

Before instagram there was …

(Source: dandi-lyon)